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VCE Studies Index

​List of VCE Units offered at St. Monica's College

Units 1&2

​Units 3&4

​Link

Religious Education Studies:​ ​ ​
​Religion & Society 1 (Year 11 only)Religion & Society 1
​Religion & Society 2 (Year 12 only)Religion & Society 2
Religion & Society 3&4 (Year 11 or 12) Religion & Society 3&4
​Texts & Traditions (Year 11 only) Texts & Traditions 2
​Texts & Traditions 3&4 (Year 11 or 12)​​Texts & Traditions 3&4
English Studies:​ ​ ​
​English 1&2​English 3&4​English
​English EAL 3&4 ​EAL students should contact the Faculty Coordinator of Literacy
​Literature 1&2 ​Literature 3&4​Literature
Other Studies:​ ​ ​
​Accounting 1&2 ​Accounting 3&4​Accounting
​Biology 1&2 ​Biology 3&4​Biology
​Business Management 1&2 ​Business Management 3&4​Business Management
​Chemistry 1&2 ​Chemistry 3&4​Chemistry
​Dance 1&2​Dance 3&4Dance
​Economics 1&2 ​Economics 3&4​Economics
​Environmental Science 1&2 ​Environmental Science 3&4​Environmental Science
​Food Studies 1&2 ​Food Studies 3&4​Food Studies
​Geography 1&2 ​Geography 3&4​Geography
​Health & Human Development 1&2 ​Health & Human Development 3&4​Health & Human Development
History: 20th Century & Global EmpiresHistory: 20th Century & Global Empires
​History: Revolutions 3&4​History: Revolutions 3&4
VCE Computing 1&2​​ VCE Computing 1&2
VCE Computing: Informatics 3 & 4 VCE Computing: Informatics 3 & 4
VCE Computing: Soft Dev 3 & 4VCE Computing: Soft Dev 3 & 4
Computing: AlgorithmicsComputing: Algorithmics
​Legal Studies 1&2 ​Legal Studies 3&4​Legal Studies
​LOTE: French 1&2 ​LOTE: French 3&4​LOTE: French
​LOTE: Greek 1&2 ​LOTE: Greek 3&4​LOTE: Greek
​LOTE: Italian 1&2 ​LOTE: Italian 3&4​LOTE: Italian
​LOTE: Japanese 1&2 ​LOTE: Japanese 3&4​LOTE: Japanese
​LOTE: Spanish 1&2 ​LOTE: Spanish 3&4​LOTE: Spanish
​Mathematics: Foundation 1&2 ​No pathway to any Unit 3&4 Mathematics​Foundation Mathematics: 1&2
​Mathematics: General 1&2​​General Mathematics 1&2
​Mathematics: Further 3&4​Futher Mathematics 3&4
Specialist ​Mathematics 1&2​​Specialist Mathematics 1&2
​Mathematics: Specialist 3&4​Specialist Mathematics 3&4
​Mathematical Methods 1&2 ​Mathematical Methods 3&4​Mathematical Methods
​Media 1&2​Media 3&4​​Media
​Music Performance 1&2 ​Music Performance 3&4​Music Performance
​Philosophy 1&2 ​Philosophy 3&4​Philosophy
​Physical Education 1&2 ​Physical Education 3&4​Physical Education
​Physics 1&2 ​Physics 3&4​Physics
​Politics 1&2​Politics 1&2
​Politics: Australian 3&4​Politics: Australian 3&4
​Product D&T: Materials 1&2 ​Product D&T: Materials 3&4​Product Des & Tech: Materials
​Product D&T: Textiles 1&2 ​Product D&T: Textiles 3&4​Product Des & Tech: Textiles
​Psychology 1&2 ​Psychology 3&4​Psychology
​Studio Arts 1&2 ​Studio Arts 3&4​Studio Arts
​Systems Engineering 1&2 ​Systems Engineering 3&4​Systems Engineering
​Theatre Studies 1&2 ​Theatre Studies 3&4​Theatre Studies
​Visual Comm. & Design 1&2 ​Visual Comm. & Design 3&4​Visual Communication & Design

 

  • VCE Religion & Society
    Unit 1

    General Description

    Religion in Society is a comparitive study of religions and beliefs, both in Australia and internationally, including both traditionally Western and Eastern philosophies, as well as the beliefs of indigenous Australians. Various religious ideas are examined as well as the ways in which these concepts are represented and expressed, both in the mainstream media and society as well as through works of literature, art or music, for example. The role of leadership within religion is also examined. Students will collect data about religious beliefs which can then be statistically analysed and interpreted. Research projects will also form the basis of assessment.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Religion & Society Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr N. Plazzer - VCE Religion & Society Teacher

    Mrs M. Tascone - Faculty Leader of Religious Studies (10-12)

    Suggested Combinations

    Given the wide appeal of VCE Religion & Society, specific recommendations are not particularly relevant. The following links are to lists of all VCE & VET subjects:

     

  • VCE Religion & Society
    Unit 2

    General Description

    Ethics can be described in simple terms as the analysis of what we value as 'right' and 'wrong'. The unit teaches students different theories and approaches to evaluating the ideas and opinions of others. Discussion will focus on what groups within society consider to be moral behaviour and values, and the extent to which ethical 'codes' may impact on popular opinions and debates. Students will learn how to create informed opinions and ethical positions across a wide variety of issues and decisions. An ability to express ideas in both writing and oral discussion is important for this unit.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Religion & Society Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mrs C. Turner - VCE Religion & Society Teacher

    Mr D. Fleischmann - VCE Religion & Society Teacher

    Mrs M. Tascone - Faculty Leader of Religious Studies (10-12)

    Suggested Combinations

    Given the wide appeal of VCE Religion & Society, specific recommendations are not particularly relevant. The following links are to lists of all VCE & VET subjects:

     

  • VCE Religion & Society
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    Units 3 & 4 Religion and Society is one of the options you have to fulfill the Religious Education requirement in Year 11. Alternatively the same units may be taken at Year 12.

    Religion and Society focuses on core religious beliefs of two or more religious traditions. It explores the way in which core beliefs are expressed through myths, religious writings, rituals, symbols, written codes of behavior, and the way they create meaning for religious communities and individuals. The unit also investigates how religious communities continue, maintain and strengthen their belief systems, and reaffirm their religious expressions during significant historical and social change. This subject is appropriate for students who are interested in international history, politics and social development. Students who study the Unit 3 & 4 sequence in Year 11 are able to gain an extra credit in the calculation of their ATAR score at the end of year 12. Because it is a Unit 3 & 4 level study, students who select it for Year 11 must have already demonstrated above average reading and writing skills in Year 10.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Religion & Society Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr J. Hili - VCE Religion & Society Teacher

    Mrs M. Tascone - Faculty Leader of Religious Studies (10-12)

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Religion & Society 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Texts & Traditions
    Unit 2

    General Description

    Unit 2 Texts & Traditions is one of the options you have to fulfil the Religious Education requirement in Year 11.

    In this unit texts are studied as a means of investigating themes such as justice, racism and gender roles. Therefore, the texts selected for study will be sources of ideas about these or other themes in society. These texts may either challenge or seek to justify attitudes and values in social, religious and political frameworks. For the investigation, students consider the social context within which the texts were produced, the conditions under which they are currently read, the reasons for reading them, and the kinds of authority attributed to them by traditions. They also look at the ways in which the texts shape, and are shaped by, the content of the message contained in them. For example, an analysis of the creation stories of Genesis could be made in order to evaluate the gender relationships implied and their influence within the history of Western society and the Christian Church.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Texts & Traditions Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr J. Capuana - VCE Text & Traditions Teacher

    Mr M. Dillon - VCE Text & Traditions Teacher

    Mrs M. Tascone - Faculty Leader of Religious Studies (10-12)

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Texts & Traditions 2:

     

  • VCE Texts & Traditions
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    Units 3 & 4 Texts & Traditions is one of the options you have to fulfil the Religious Education requirement in Year 11. Alternatively the same units may be taken at Year 12.

    Texts & Traditions is centred mainly on the close analysis of a Gospel of Luke, identifying the events, people and places relating to the early development of Christianity. As well as looking at religious beliefs and themes, the study considers the development and context of the scriptures, including how they have been interpreted in various ways. Because of this approach, it is particularly appropriate for students with capabilities in subjects such as History, Philosophy and Literature. Students who study the Unit 3 & 4 sequence in Year 11 are able to gain an extra credit in the calculation of their ATAR score at the end of Year 12. Because it is a Unit 3 & 4 level study, students who select it for Year 11 must have already demonstrated above average reading and writing skills in Year 10.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Texts & Traditions Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr J. Capuana - VCE Text & Traditions Teacher

    Mr D. Dillon - VCE Text & Traditions Teacher

    Mrs M. Tascone - Faculty Leader of Religious Studies (10-12)

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Texts & Traditions 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE English
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    English at VCE is the broadest English study that students can undertake. As all students must complete an English study in VCE, this subject is the most popular choice to fulfil this requirement. Areas of study include reading and responding to texts, creating texts in response to presented characters and ideas, and the study of how arguments and language is used to persuade readers in media texts. Students are also required to complete one of their assessments in oral form. Units 1 & 2 develop the skills that students will need for completion of Units 3 & 4 and it is recommended that all students complete a minimum of Unit 2 English if they intend to study Units 3 & 4.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE English Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Molony - Faculty Leader of English

    Suggested Combinations

    Given the wide appeal of VCE English, specific recommendations are not particularly relevant. The following links are to lists of all VCE & VET subjects:

     

  • VCE Literature
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Literature is the study of both fiction and non fiction texts. It offers students a chance to read widely, explore how meaning is created in a range of texts and evaluate the views and values evident within the texts. The creative response is also a significant part of the internal assessment. Literature is recommended for students who enjoy reading and have good writing skills. Students need to be willing to discuss texts and form their own opinions. It is advised that students complete a minimum of Unit 1 Literature before undertaking Units 3 & 4. Students who demonstrate a strong ability in English text study or who have met an acceptable standard in the Year 10 Literature elective may be permitted to undertake a full year of study in Units 1 & 2 as their only English study. However, they should be certain that they intend to continue with Units 3 & 4 only in Year 12. Many students who are competent at English choose to study Literature in Units 1, 2, 3 & 4 as a second study.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Literature Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Molony - Faculty Leader of English

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Texts & Traditions 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Accounting
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Accounting explores the financial recording, reporting, analysis and decision-making processes of a sole proprietor small business. Students study both theoretical and practical aspects of accounting. They collect, record, report and analyse financial data, and report, classify, verify and interpret accounting information, using both manual methods and information and communications technology (ICT). Students apply critical thinking skills to a range of business situations to model alternative outcomes and to provide accounting advice to business owners. In business decision-making, financial as well as ethical considerations (incorporating social and environmental aspects) should be taken into account.

    The study is made up of four units. Unit 1: Role of accounting in business. Unit 2: Accounting and decision-making for a trading business. Unit 3: Financial accounting for a trading business. Unit 4: Recording, reporting, budgeting and decision-making Each unit deals with specific content contained in areas of study and is designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes for that unit.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Accounting Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Ms C. Lemos - Teacher of VCE Accounting

    Ms T. Kremers - Teacher of VCE Accounting

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Accounting:

     

  • VCE Biology
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Biology is the study of the characteristics which enable plants and animals to function effectively in their environment. The structure, function and activities of cells at the molecular level is examined to understand the role of DNA and cellular processes in the survival, origins and diversity of living organisms. Units 1 & 2 focus on Australian ecosystems and the interactions between living things and their non-living surroundings. The cell as a functional unit of the whole organism is examined as well as the digestive, respiratory, circulatory, urinary and reproductive systems of organisms. Units 3 & 4 examine mechanisms which enhance the survival of organisms in the face of changing conditions and environments. The concepts of inheritance, variation and diversity are also studied. Biology is an ideal subject for students who have an interest in the environment, the internal workings of plants, animals and the human body and the impact of science on the modern world. A sound understanding of mathematical processes and the ability to interpret data combined with a willingness to read and the ability to comprehend complicated text is required to undertake this subject.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Biology Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Thomson - Faculty Leader of Science

    Mrs S. Esmaquel - VCE Biology Teacher

    Ms A. Hetherington - VCE Biology Teacher

    Ms M. Wong - VCE Biology Teacher

    Miss C. Simpson - VCE Biology Teacher

    Ms L. Rigoni - VCE Biology Teacher

    Ms M. Grant - VCE Biology Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Biology:

     

  • VCE Business Management
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Business Management examines the ways businesses manage resources to achieve objectives. The study design follows the process from the first idea for a business concept, to planning and establishing a business, through to the day-to-day management of a business. It also considers changes that need to be made to ensure continued success of a business. Students develop an understanding of the complexity of the challenges facing decision makers in managing these resources.

    In Unit 1, student will be planning a business. Exploring the factors affecting business ideas & the internal & external environments within which businesses operate, and the effect on planning.

    In Unit 2, they will be establishing a business. Examining the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. Investigate the essential features of effective marketing and the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing & financial record keeping

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Business Management - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr. S Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Ms T. Hislop - VCE Business Management Teacher

    Ms T. Kremers - VCE Business Management Teacher

    Ms M. Tascone - VCE Business Management Teacher

    Ms K. Mignano - VCE Business Management Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Business Management:

     

  • VCE Chemistry
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Chemistry is a key science in explaining the workings of our universe through an understanding of the properties and interaction of substances that make up matter. It is the study of the basic structure of matter, what substances are made of, their properties, how they act and how they interact. Units 1 & 2 focus on the concepts of Chemistry, including Environmental Chemistry while Units 3 & 4 focus on chemical pathways and chemistry at work. Chemistry permeates numerous fields of endeavour and caters to students with diverse interests such as agriculture, art, biochemistry, engineering, environmental studies, food technology, forensic science, horticulture, law, medicine, oceanography, pharmacy and sports science. The ability to interpret data and apply knowledge to familiar and unfamiliar situations is necessary to study this subject, and it is strongly recommended that students combine Chemistry with Mathematical Methods through Units 1 - 4 in order to comprehend the mathematical processes that are integral to this study.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Chemistry Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Thomson - Faculty Leader of Science

    Miss C. Simpson - VCE Chemistry Teacher

    Ms R. Privitelli - VCE Chemistry Teacher

    Miss R. Zammit - VCE Chemistry Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Chemistry:

     

  • VCE Dance
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Dance is the language of movement. The focus of Dance is the realisation of the body's potential as an instrument of expression, and frequently uses musical accompaniment to regulate its form. Units 1 & 2 concentrate on developing technical and physical skills through a range of body actions in dance. Units 3 & 4 focus on choreography, solo dance works and improving dance skills. It is an ideal subject for students who wish to express themselves in a creative manner, or explore the physical rhythm and structure of the body in a controlled manner. Sound writing skills are required. Students will analyse a number of dance works, and students should be prepared to work across a number of different dance styles and formats. Sound writing skills are required for theory components of the course. It is also recommended that students intending to select this VCE subject have had some form of previous dance training.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Dance Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr M. Spiteri - Performing Arts Faculty Coordinator

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Dance:

     

  • VCE Economics
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Economics is the study of how resources are allocated to meet the needs and wants of society. It attempts to explain how and why individuals behave the way they do and the consequences of their decision making. Studying Economics as a social science enables students to gain valuable insight into the economic problems that they may face on an individual basis and collectively as a society to meet the needs and wants of citizens, and may therefore assist them in making more informed and responsible decisions.

    The study is made up of four units. Unit 1: The behaviour of consumers and businesses Unit 2: Contemporary economic issues Unit 3: Australia’s economic prosperity Unit 4: Managing the economy.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Economics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Mr L. Rabenda - Teacher of VCE Economics

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Economics:

     

  • VCE Environmental Science
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Environmental Science provides students with the opportunity to understand the structure, function and diversity of natural ecosystems on this planet and evaluate the impact of human activities. Students will examine strategies to maintain and protect the ecological health of our environment while meeting the needs and desires of human populations. Units 1 & 2 focus on the environment and its components and the effects of changes in ecosystems, both natural and human-induced. Data collection and interpretation is used to establish the health of the environment. Units 3 & 4 focus on major ecological issues which provide challenges for the present and future, such as the greenhouse effect, and pollution is examined in its relationship to human health. Environmental Science is an ideal subject for students who have a keen interest in the living and non-living components of the environment, the current impact that humans have had, and the predicted outcomes for the future. A sound understanding of mathematical processes, the ability to interpret data, and a willingness to read and comprehend complicated texts is required to undertake this subject.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Environmental Science Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Thomson - Faculty Leader of Science

    Ms M. Wong - VCE Environmental Science Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Environmental Science:

     

  • VCE Food Studies
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    This study is designed to give students a greater understanding of food as a commodity and knowledge of food preparation and production from a small-scale perspective to mass-production in industry. Students will focus on developing skills in planning, preparation and evaluation of food products. Unit 1 focuses on the diverse nature of food and how to prepare and store it for best quality in terms of safety, health and aesthetics. Unit 2 explores the the methods, tools and equipment required to produce optimum results, preparing for a range of situations through the use of the design process. Unit 3 investigates the functions of natural food components and their best cooking techniques, as well as preservation and spoilage prevention. Unit 4 requires students to implement a design plan for a set of food items and evaluate these against their design brief from Unit 3. Food Technology is an ideal subject for students who are considering careers in the Food Science/Technology, Dietetics, Marketing, or Health Studies fields. A sound ability to plan, prepare and evaluate is required to undertake this subject.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Food & Technology Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms P. Clarke - Head of Food Technology Department

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Food & Technology:

     

  • VCE Geography
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    The study of Geography is a structured way of exploring, analysing and understanding the characteristics of places that make up our world. Geographers are interested in key questions concerning places and geographic phenomena: What is there? Where is it? Why is it there? What are the effects of it being there? How is it changing over time and how could, and should, it change in the future? How is it different from other places and phenomena? How are places and phenomena connected?
    In Unit 1: Hazards and Disasters students undertake an overview of hazards before investigating two contrasting types of hazards and the responses to them by people. Students examine the processes involved with hazards and hazard events, including their causes and impacts, human responses to hazard events and interconnections between human activities and natural phenomena. This unit investigates how people have responded to specific types of hazards, including attempts to reduce vulnerability to, and the impact of, hazard events. The hazards include: geological ( volcanoes), hydro-meteorological (floods), biological ( HIV/AIDS) and technological (nuclear radiation). Students undertake fieldwork in this unit and report on fieldwork using appropriate structures and procedures.
    In Unit 2: Tourism, is studied. Students investigate the characteristics of tourism, with particular emphasis on where it has developed, its various forms, how it has changed and continues to change and its impacts on people, places and environments. Students select contrasting examples of tourism from within Australia and elsewhere in the world to support their investigations. The study of tourism at local, regional and global scales emphasises the interconnection within and between places. Students explore the interconnections of climate, landforms and culture that help determine the characteristics of a place that can prove attractive to tourists. Students explore the relationships and interconnections of transport infrastructure, employment, cultural preservation and acculturation of a destination and the environmental sustainability of tourism. Students undertake fieldwork in this unit and report on fieldwork using appropriate structures and procedures.
    Unit 3: Changing the land This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water. Students investigate three major processes that are changing land cover in many regions of the world including deforestation, desertification, and melting glaciers and ice sheets. Students investigate the distribution and causes of these three processes. They select one location for each of the three processes to develop a greater understanding of the changes to land cover produced by these processes, the impacts of these changes and responses to these changes at different scales. At a local scale students investigate land use change using appropriate fieldwork techniques and secondary sources. They investigate the scale of change, the reasons for change and the impacts of change. Students undertake fieldwork in this unit and report on fieldwork using appropriate structures and procedures.
    Unit 4: Human population – trends and issues. In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore the patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the world. They examine the dynamics of populations and their economic, social, political and environmental impacts on people and places. Through the study of population dynamics students investigate growth and decline in fertility and mortality, together with population movements. Students study forced and voluntary, and internal and external, population movements and how they can be long term or short term. Students undertake investigations into two significant population trends that have developed in different parts of the world: a growing population of one country and an ageing population of another country. Students place these trends and resulting issues and challenges in their world regional context. Issues resulting from these population trends include, among others, meeting healthcare and social service needs. Students investigate issues arising from each population trend, the challenges that arise in coping with the issues, and their interconnection with population dynamics. They evaluate the effectiveness of strategies in response to these issues and challenges. Student will draw on key knowledge and key skills of the course and complete a cross-study ( case study) on the areas of study in this unit.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Geography Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Mrs C Turner - VCE Geography Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Geography:

     

  • VCE Health & Human Development
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    This study provides students with the opportunity to investigate health and development throughout the life span and the world. Students will develop the knowledge, skills and values to become actively involved in shaping their own health and development, as well as that of their local and global communities. Unit 1 focuses on the changes and challenges facing Youth as they progress into adulthood. Unit 2 explores the health and development of the human throughout their life span and the role played by the health care system. Unit 3 investigates the health and nutritional status of the Australian population and strategies to promote and improve the health and development of our nation. Unit 4 examines the promotion and improvement of the health status and development of the world's population with particular focus on third world countries. This subject is ideal for students pursuing courses and careers in health and human services, teaching, nursing, nutritional and global studies.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Health & Human Development Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr B. Beecham - Faculty Leader of Health and Physical Education

    Ms J. Southall - VCE Health & Human Development Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Health & Human Development:

     

  • VCE History: 20th Century & Global Empires

    Notice to students:

    This study of History (Unit 2 20th Century) is part of a 2 unit sequence with Unit 2 Global Empires offered in Semester 2 for History. Students intending on completing History Revolutions Russia and France in Units 3 & 4 are advised that these two Year 11 Units of History ( Unit 2 - 20th Century and Unit 2 - Global Empires) are pre-requisites for Revolutions History. Unit 2 Global Empires is a pre-requisite for Revolutions History in Year 12.

    Unit 2: Twentieth Century History (1945 – 2000) Offered in Semester 1 only.

    In Unit 2 students explore the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and changes to existing political, economic and social arrangements in the second half of the Twentieth Century (20th Century).

    The establishment of the United Nations in 1945 was intended to take an internationalist approach to avoiding warfare, resolving political tensions and addressing threats to human life and safety. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted in 1948 was the first global expression of human rights. Despite internationalist moves, the second half of the twentieth century was dominated by the competing ideologies of democracy and communism, setting the backdrop for the Cold War.

    The period also saw challenge and change to the established order in many countries. Old conflicts also continued and terrorism became increasingly global. The second half of the twentieth century also saw the rise of social movements that challenged existing values and traditions, such as the civil rights movement, feminism and environmental movements.

    Area of Study 1: Competing ideologies
    In this Area of Study students focus on causes and consequences of the Cold War; the competing ideologies that underpinned events, the effects on people, groups and nations, and the reasons for the end of this sustained period of ideological conflict. Students explore the causes of the Cold War in the aftermath of World War Two. They investigate significant events and developments and the consequences for nations and people in the period 1945 –1991. While the USA and the USSR never engaged in direct armed conflict, they opposed each other in a range of international conflicts such as those in Berlin, Korea, Cuba and Vietnam. They both tried to exert their influence through aid and propaganda in Africa, Asia and the Americas and engaged in an arms race and a space race with competition also extending to sport and the arts. Students consider the reasons for the end of this long-running period of ideological conflict and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

    Area of Study 2: Challenge and change
    In this Area of Study students focus on the ways in which traditional ideas, values and political systems were challenged and changed by individuals and groups in a range of contexts during the period 1945 to 2000. Students explore the causes of significant political and social events and movements, and their consequences for nations and people. Students explore the ways in which traditional ideas, values and political systems were challenged and changed by individuals and groups in a range of contexts during the period 1945 to 2000. Students investigate the causes of significant political and social events and movements, and their consequences for nations and people.

    While the Cold War dominated the second half of the twentieth century, political and social challenge and change occurred within and between nations based on religion, nationalism, race, gender and human rights. Developments in mass communication including the internet and satellite television meant that many of the political and social movements transcended national boundaries and were exposed to a global audience.

    Independence movements led to the emergence of new nations. While terrorism was not a new historical phenomenon, it took on new dimensions and became increasingly globalised. Other conflicts continued in the second half of the Century. These included the Arab–Israeli conflict, the struggle against Apartheid in South Africa and conflict in Northern Ireland. In the Western world groups emerged to challenge the ways that power structures were organised, distributed and used. Traditional attitudes to race, war, gender, sexuality, religion, the environment and human rights were questioned.

    Students study challenge and change in relation to two of the following:

    • conflicts such as the Arab–Israeli dispute, the anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa, the Irish ‘troubles’
    • social and political movements such as civil rights campaigns in the USA, feminism, environmentalism and the peace movement.

    Unit 2 Global Empires: Empires at Work (1600 - 1776) (offered in Semester 2 as prerequisite for Revolutions History 3 & 4)

    In this unit students explore the operation of European colonies and the challenges they faced from within and without. In the Early Modern period, 1400 –1775, new empires began to establish colonies and to trade on a global scale. Students investigate how the British settled the 13 Colonies of America (USA) and the manner in which the internal relationships between Indigenous Native Americans, slaves and colonial settlers developed and ‘fractured’ over time. External factors cause problems in the colonies as rival powers France and Spain jostled for advantage, alliances and resources on this continent culminating in all-out global warfare in the Seven Years’ War (1754– 63). Britain’s success in this war led to a period of dominance which lasted well into the Twentieth Century.

    Area of Study 1: New colonies, new profits.
    In this area of study students investigate how and why new colonies were established by the British Empire and the significance of new global systems of exchange. They explore how imperialism expressed itself in a variety of strategic, commercial, religious and cultural ways, studying in depth how England colonised the east coast of North America establishing the 13 American colonies (east coast of USA).

    Students investigate the clash of cultures and interests between English colonists and Native Americans. As colonists quickly set about maximising profit from the human and natural resources available, indigenous peoples struggled to survive and maintain their culture. The rise of plantations gave impetus to the ‘triangular trade’ as slaves, raw materials and manufactured goods were exchanged between Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean and Europe. This lucrative trade had profound human costs and prompted a few localised rebellions and the first petitions to abolish slavery.

    Area of Study 2: Challenges of Empire – Britain versus the 13 Colonies
    In this area of study students investigate the difficulties faced by England in maintaining her colonies and their effectiveness at dealing with these challenges.

    Once European empires had gained control over new colonies from the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries, they faced the on-going challenge of maintaining and protecting them. Relations with indigenous people also proved difficult, with outright warfare in some cases and more indirect tensions in others. In the instance of Native American nations, trade relationships and alliances with competing European powers added to tensions between empires and played a part in the first global war, the Seven Years’ War (c. 1756 – 63).

    The costs of this war on Great Britain became the catalyst for the strain on her relationship with her American colonies. Taxation, ongoing costs of keeping up supplies and military protection, drove settlers to create an independent identity and break away from the mother country entirely, as occurred when the American War of Independence began in 1775. Students investigate the oncoming causes of ‘revolution’ in the American Colonies which led to the War for Independence.

    This Unit 2 study is essential for students who wish to undertake VCE Units 3 & 4 History Revolutions. The course is designed to enhance and reinforce history literacy and writing skills. Knowledge and content in this course is important background knowledge for Revolutions France studies in Units 3 & 4.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE History Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE History Units 1 & 2:

     

  • VCE History: Revolutions
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    This is a Units 3 & 4 study which links from Units 1 & 2 History. Both subjects, along with Units 3 & 4 History: Revolutions are part of the VCE History framework, where students can elect to study either or both of the Unit 3 & 4 sequences. Students will explore the nature in which the Italian Renaissance flourished in Florence and Venice between the 15th and 16th Centuries. Individuals and groups in society seek to obtain power and authority and this study explores the intricate relationship that wealth, power, art, politics, trade, and religion played in creating flourishing and vibrate Renaissance cities in Italy. Students compare the distinct geographic, cultural, and socio-political challenges and changes of each city and the manner in which patronage of the arts, wealth and political and religious power brought individuals and nation states to prominence. Primary sources, such as diaries, paintings and buildings connected with the patronage of prominent artists and architects of the Renaissance period are studied. This subject is most suited to students with exceptional essay writing skills who can see links between History and Art, are insightful, have analytical ability and who can work effectively and independently.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE History Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - VCE History Teacher & Humanities Faculty Coordinator

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE History: Renaissance Italy 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE History: Revolutions
    Units 3&4: Revolutions

    General Description

    In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. Revolution is a dramatically accelerated process whereby the new order attempts to create political and social change and transformation based on a new ideology.

    In these units students develop an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of causes and consequences in the revolutionary narrative. They construct an argument about the past using primary sources as evidence and evaluate the extent to which the revolution brought change to the lives of people. They consider how perspectives of the revolution give an insight into the continuity and change experienced by those who lived through dramatic revolutionary moments. Students evaluate historical interpretations about the causes and consequences of revolution and the effects of change instigated by the new order.

    Students study one revolution in each semester: Unit 3: The French Revolution of 1789 and Unit 4: The Russian Revolution of October 1917.

    Area of Study 1: Causes of revolution

    • What were the significant causes of revolution?
    • How did the actions of popular movements and particular individuals contribute to triggering a revolution?
    • To what extent did social tensions and ideological conflicts contribute to the outbreak of revolution?

    In this area of study students analyse the long-term causes and short-term triggers of revolution. They evaluate how revolutionary outbreaks are caused by the interplay of significant events, ideas, individuals and popular movements and assess how these were directly or indirectly influenced by the social, political, economic and cultural conditions. Students analyse significant events and evaluate how particular conditions profoundly influenced and contributed to the outbreak of revolution. Revolutionary review the ideologies which emerged in opposition to the existing and dominant order. Students evaluate the extent to which the revolution was caused by the motivations and the intended and unintended actions of individuals who shape and influence the course of revolution.

    Area of Study 2: Consequences of revolution

    • How did the consequences of revolution shape the new order?
    • How did the new regime consolidate its power?
    • How did the revolution affect the experiences of those who lived through it?
    • To what extent was society changed and revolutionary ideas achieved?

    In this area of study students analyse the consequences of the revolution and evaluate the extent to which it brought change to society. The success of the revolution was not inevitable; therefore, students analyse the significant challenges that confronted the new regime after the initial outbreak of revolution. Furthermore, they evaluate the success of the new regime’s responses to these challenges and the extent to which the consequences of revolution resulted in dramatic and wide reaching social, political, economic and cultural change, progress or decline.

    As new orders attempted to consolidate power, post-revolutionary regimes were often challenged by those who opposed change. They may have unleashed civil war and counter-revolutions, making the survival and consolidation of the revolution the principal concern of the revolutionary state. The consequences of these challenges sometimes resulted in a compromise of revolutionary ideologies, as the leaders of the new order became more authoritarian and responded with violence and policies of terror and repression, initiating severe policies of social control as pragmatic strategies to stay in power.

    In analysing the past, students engage with the historical perspectives as well as the experiences of those whose conditions of everyday life were affected by the revolution.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE History Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE History: Revolutions 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Industry & Enterprise
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Industry and Enterprise recognises the vocational, economic, social and cultural aspects of work and encourages students to undertake a theoretical and practical investigation of these aspects throughout the four units. A key feature of the study is the requirement that students undertake work outside the classroom in order to develop a range of lifelong and work-related skills. Units 1 & 2 explore career pathways and offer students with an examination of their own work related skills and competencies. Units 3 & 4 analyse and examine the role of enterprise and the development of an enterprise culture in relation to work and personal settings, the forces of innovation, quality, technology and workplace flexibility with their potential impact, pressures and opportunities for change within the global and domestic economies, and the resulting changes at the workplace level, and the development of lifelong and work-related skills. Industry & Enterprise is a complimentary subject to Business Management.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Industry & Enterprise - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Mrs H. Rabenda - VCE Industry & Enterprise Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Industry & Enterprise:

     

  • VCE Computing
    Units 1&2

    General Description

    VCE Computing focuses on the application of a problem-solving methodology, and strategies and techniques for managing information systems in a range of contexts, to create digital solutions that meet specific needs. The study examines the attributes of each component of an information system including people, processes, data and digital systems (hardware, software, networks), and how their interrelationships affect the types and quality of digital solutions.

    VCE Computing supports students to participate in a globalised society and economy as they learn how to exploit the capabilities of digital systems and manage risks when communicating and collaborating with others locally and globally. The study provides students with practical opportunities to create digital solutions for real-world problems in a range of settings, developing an essential tool set for current and future learning, work and social endeavours. VCE Computing provides a pathway to further studies in areas such as computer science, information systems, business, systems engineering, robotics, linguistics, logistics, database management and software development, and to careers in digital-technologies based areas such as information architecture, web design, business analysis and project management.

    Area of Study 1 Any software tool to create a graphic solution. Area of Study 2 A graphic tool to represent a network solution. Area of Study 3 Web authoring software, visualising thinking tool/s, tool for planning a project.

    Area of Study 1 A programming or scripting language that can support object-oriented programming. Area of Study 2 One data manipulation tool and one visualisation tool, for example a programming language, database software, spreadsheet software, data visualisation software. Area of Study 3 Database management software.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Computing - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Mrs S. Pavia - Teacher of VCE Computing

    Mr M. Quilliam - Teacher of VCE Computing

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Computing 1 & 2:

     

  • VCE Computing: Algorithmics

    General Description

    Computing is central to our society and economy and drives innovation across many fields of human endeavour. Computation has fundamentally transformed the way we conduct science and engineering; simulation, virtual experiments and computational analysis and prediction have become indispensable parts of the contemporary scientific method. Computation enables us to make sense of data, whether it concerns the environment, the economy, health, entertainment, social and organisational structures or any other sphere of human experience. Algorithmics underpins all computational methods and only through using algorithms can there be full appreciation of their potential and limitations, allowing the development of efficient computational solutions.

    VCE Algorithmics (HESS) provides the foundation for studying computer science and software engineering at tertiary level and some universities may offer accelerated pathways to students who have completed this study. The study also provides a conceptual framework for structured problem solving in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and other disciplines that benefit from formal reasoning.

    VCAA Information

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Mr M. Quilliam - Teacher of Algorithmics

    Suggested Combinations

  • VCE Computing: Informatics
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    In Informatics Units 3 and 4 students focus on data, information and information systems. In Unit 3 students consider data and how it is acquired, managed, manipulated and interpreted to meet a range of needs. In Area of Study 1 students investigate the way organisations acquire data using interactive online solutions, such as websites and applications (apps), and consider how users interact with these solutions when conducting online transactions. In Area of Study 2 students complete the first part of a project. They frame a hypothesis and then select, acquire and organise data from multiple data sets to confirm or refute this hypothesis. This data is manipulated using tools such as spreadsheets or databases to help analyse and interpret it so that students can form a conclusion regarding their hypothesis. Students take an organised approach to problem solving by preparing project plans and monitoring the progress of the project.

    In Unit 4 students focus on strategies and techniques for manipulating, managing and securing data and information to meet a range of needs. In Area of Study 1 students draw on the analysis and conclusion of their hypothesis determined in Unit 3, Outcome 2, and then design, develop and evaluate a multimodal, online solution that effectively communicates the conclusion and findings.. In Area of Study 2, students explore how different organisations manage the storage and disposal of data and information to minimise threats to the integrity and security of data and information and to optimise the handling of information.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Computing: Informatics 3 & 4 - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Mr A. Vasiagin – Teacher of VCE Computing

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Computing: Informatics 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Computing: Software Development
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    In Software development Units 3 and 4 students focus on the application of a problem-solving methodology and underlying skills to create purpose-designed solutions using a programming language.

    In Unit 3 students develop a detailed understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology and use a programming language to create working software modules. In Area of Study 1 students respond to given software designs and develop a set of working modules through the use of a programming language. In Area of Study 2 students analyse a need or opportunity, plan and design a solution and develop computational, design and systems thinking skills. This forms the first part of a project that is completed in Unit 4.

    In Unit 4 students focus on how the information needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software solutions used in a networked environment. They continue to study the programming language used in Unit 3. In Area of Study 1 students further their computational thinking skills by transforming their detailed design prepared in Unit 3 into a software solution. They evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the solution in meeting needs or opportunities. They also assess the effectiveness of the project plan in monitoring project progress. In Area of Study 2 students apply systems thinking skills when explaining the relationship between two information systems that share data and how that dependency affects the performance of the systems.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Information Technology - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Ms S. Pavia - Teacher of VCE Computing

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Information Technology: Software Development 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Legal Studies
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Legal Studies provides students with an analytical evaluation of the processes of law-making and the methods of dispute resolution. Students develop an understanding of the impact that our legal system has upon the lives of citizens and the implications of legal decisions on the Australian economy. Unit 1 concentrates on investigating the importance of criminal law and the nature of criminal liability. Unit 2 focuses on civil procedures and the role of the jury in civil dispute resolution. Unit 3 investigates the principles of the Australian parliamentary system and evaluating the overall effectiveness of law-making through Parliament. Unit 4 explores and compares the function and jurisdiction of the courts, tribunals, alternative methods of dispute resolution and the jury system. Legal Studies caters for those students who have an ability to identify, collect and process data from a range of sources and use the inquiry process to develop legal reasoning. Students who select Legal Studies should be well organized, read newspapers and be willing to extend their reading out of classtime in order to develop informed opinions.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Legal Studies - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr S. Bagh - Faculty Leader of Commerce and Computing

    Ms M. Pezzi - VCE Legal Studies Teacher

    Ms T. Hislop - VCE Legal Studies Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Legal Studies:

     

  • VCE LOTE: French
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE French is the study of how to communicate in French and how the French language functions. It also develops understanding of the cultural context in which French is spoken. A study of a second language can also help better understand one's own culture and language. The focus in VCE is on three areas: "Me"- introducing and describing your likes and interests in French; "France"– lifestyle, foods, and traditions; and "The changing world" – new technologies and the changes they bring to French speaking communities. Units 1 & 2 cover all these areas broadly, while Units 3 & 4 allow for a deeper understanding of specific areas. The course is designed primarily for students who have studied French in previous years. VCE French is suited to students who have an interest in communication, on how language works and for those who have a passion for speaking French. Students must be prepared to engage in regular written and oral communication practice. A second language has traditionally been viewed as a invaluable asset for any students intending to study at a tertiary level.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE French - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms M. Theodosis - Faculty Leader of LOTE

    Ms L. Maloney - VCE LOTE: French Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Legal Studies:

     

  • VCE LOTE: Greek
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Greek is the study of how to communicate in Greek and how the modern Greek language functions. It also furthers your understanding of the cultural context in which Greek is spoken. A study of a second language can also help you better understand your own culture and language. The focus in VCE is on three areas: "Me"- introducing and describing your likes and interests in Greek; "Greece"– lifestyle, foods, and traditions; and "The changing world" – new technologies and the changes they bring to Greek speaking communities. Units 1 & 2 covers all these areas broadly, while Units 3 & 4 allow for a deeper understanding of specific areas. The course is designed primarily for students who have studied Greek in previous years. VCE Greek is suited to students who have an interest in communication, on how language works and for those who have a passion for speaking Greek. Students must be prepared to engage in regular written and oral communication practice. A second language has traditionally been viewed as an invaluable asset for any students intending to study at a tertiary level.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Greek Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms M. Theodosis - Faculty Leader of LOTE

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE LOTE: Greek:

     

  • VCE LOTE: Italian
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Italian is the study of how to communicate in Italian and how the Italian language functions. It also furthers your understanding of the cultural context in which Italian is spoken. A study of a second language can also help you better understand your own culture and language. The focus in VCE is on three areas: "Me"- introducing and describing your likes and interests in Italian; "Italy"– lifestyle, foods, and traditions; and "The changing world" – new technologies and the changes they bring to Italian speaking communities. Units 1 & 2 covers all these areas broadly, while Units 3 & 4 allow for a deeper understanding of specific areas. The course is designed primarily for students who have studied Italian in previous years. VCE Italian is suited to students who have an interest in communication, on how language works and for those who have a passion for speaking Italian. Students must be prepared to engage in regular written and oral communication practice. A second language has traditionally been viewed as an invaluable asset for any students intending to study at a tertiary level.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Italian Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms M. Theodosis - Faculty Leader of LOTE

    Ms P. Dunne - VCE LOTE: Italian Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE LOTE: Italian:

     

  • VCE LOTE: Japanese
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Japanese is the study of how to communicate in Japanese and how the Japanese language functions. It also furthers your understanding of the cultural context in which Japanese is spoken. A study of a second language can also help you better understand your own culture and language. The focus in VCE is on three areas: "Me"- introducing and describing your likes and interests in Japanese; "Japan"– lifestyle, foods, and traditions; and "The changing world" – new technologies and the changes they bring to Japanese speaking communities. Units 1 & 2 covers all these areas broadly, while Units 3 & 4 allow for a deeper understanding of specific areas. The course is designed primarily for students who have studied Japanese in previous years. VCE Japanese is suited to students who have an interest in communication, on how language works and for those who have a passion for speaking Japanese. Students must be prepared to engage in regular written and oral communication practice. A second language has traditionally been viewed as an invaluable asset for any students intending to study at a tertiary level.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Japanese (Second Language) Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms M. Theodosis - Faculty Leader of LOTE

    Ms E. Ida - VCE LOTE: Japanese Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE LOTE: Japanese:

     

  • VCE LOTE: Spanish
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Spanish is the study of how to communicate in Spanish and how the Spanish language functions. It also furthers your understanding of the cultural context in which Spanish is spoken. A study of a second language can also help you better understand your own culture and language. The focus in VCE is on three areas: "Me"- introducing and describing your likes and interests in Spanish; "Spain"– lifestyle, foods, and traditions; and "The changing world" – new technologies and the changes they bring to Spanish speaking communities. Units 1 & 2 covers all these areas broadly, while Units 3 & 4 allow for a deeper understanding of specific areas. The course is designed primarily for students who have studied Spanish in previous years. VCE Spanish is suited to students who have an interest in communication, on how language works and for those who have a passion for speaking Spanish. Students must be prepared to engage in regular written and oral communication practice. A second language has traditionally been viewed as an invaluable asset for any students intending to study at a tertiary level.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Spanish Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms M. Theodosis - Faculty Leader of LOTE

    Ms A. Fattori - LOTE: Spanish Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE LOTE: Spanish:

     

  • VCE Foundation Mathematics
    Units 1&2

    General Description

    A study designed to provide basic skills and knowledge in mathematics applicable to the real world, including shape, measurement, handling data, percentages and applications. The focus of the study is on developing these essential skills and knowledge. Students undertaking this study at Units 1 & 2 are ineligible to complete any Units 3 & 4 Mathematics subjects. It is an ideal subject for students who would like to study a VCE Mathematics, but are either a Year 10 Foundation Mathematics student, or have performed below standard in Year 10 Maths A. Students currently studying Year 10 Maths A who are considering Foundation Maths in Year 11 should check at the Careers Office whether they require mathematics for future pathways, as Foundation Mathematics is not sufficent for some tertiary or TAFE courses.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Foundation Mathematics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Foundation Mathematics 1 & 2:

     

  • VCE Mathematics: General
    Units 1&2

    General Description

    This study focuses on the real life application of mathematics, including data analysis, geometry, trigonometry, number patterns, linear modeling, networks, matrices and financial mathematics. The focus of this subject is on the interpretation and analysis of statistical data in mathematics. Students who have achieved the expected standard in Year 10 Maths A or B are suitable candidates for this study. It is ideal as background knowledge for Further Mathematics Units 3 & 4. A sound ability in reading and comprehension is required to undertake this study, as well as a good understanding of the CAS calculator and its functions.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE General Mathematics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Ms G. Mifsud - VCE General Mathematics Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    Given the wide appeal of VCE General Mathematics 1 & 2, specific recommendations are not particularly relevant. The following links are to lists of all VCE & VET subjects:

     

  • VCE Mathematics: Further
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    Further Mathematics consists of a compulsory core area of study, 'Data Analysis', and then a selection of three from the six modules in the 'Applications' area of study. Unit 3 comprises the data analysis area which incorporates a statistical application task, and one of the selected modules. Unit 4 comprises the other two selected modules. Assumed knowledge and skills for the data analysis area of study are contained in the topics: univariate data, bivariate data, linear graphs & modelling, and linear relations and equations from General Maths Units 1 & 2. Use of technology to support the teaching and learning of mathematics is incorporated throughout the units.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Further Mathematics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Ms S. Emirzian - VCE Further Mathematics Teacher

    Ms P. Di Maria - VCE Further Mathematics Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    Given the wide appeal of VCE Further Mathematics 3 & 4, specific recommendations are not particularly relevant. The following links are to lists of all VCE & VET subjects:

     

  • VCE Mathematics: Specialist
    Units 1&2

    General Description

    This is an advanced study of mathematical theory, including coordinate geometry, trigonometry, partial fractions, graphs, non linear relations, kinematics, vectors and statistics. It is only recommended to students who studied Accelerated Mathematics or who performed above standard in Year 10 Maths B. This subject must be studied concurrently with Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2. Strong mathematical knowledge is required to study this unit, as well as the ability to show mathematical working with and without a CAS calculator. Specialist Mathematics Units 1/2 are designed to prepare students for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 and/or to assist students in undertaking Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4 with greater confidence.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE General Mathematics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Ms S. Pavia - VCE Specialist Mathematics Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Specialist Mathematics 1 & 2:

     

  • VCE Mathematics: Specialist
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    An extended study of co-ordinate geometry, circular functions, calculus, algebra, vectors and mechanics. This study is intended for students who need to achieve the highest possible level in mathematics, which may be required to maximise their tertiary study opportunities. It is only recommended for students who perform well in General Maths Units 1 & 2, combined with solid results in Mathematical Methods. This subject must be studied concurrently with Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4. Excellent comprehension skills are required, along with the ability to demonstrate logical and sequential thinking processes, both with and without the assistance of a calculator. Students who undertake this subject may consider the possibility of combining Specialist Mathematics with a Monash University Mathematics unit in Year 12, which may supplement their ATAR score calculation, depending on their results.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Specialist Mathematics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Mr J. Shih - VCE Specialist Mathematics Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Specialist Mathematics 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Mathematical Methods
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    The focus of Mathematical Methods is on mathematical technique through the study of functions and graphs, trigonometry, rates of change, calculus and probability. There is a strong emphasis on demonstrating knowledge and understanding without the use of a calculator or notes. Units 1 & 2 introduce and develop skills while Units 3 & 4 provide for a deeper analysis of the same skills. Students will undertake two exams at the end of their study, a one-hour technology free examination and a two-hour examination where students may use their graphics calculator and a bound resource of notes. Students who undertake this study must have sound comprehension skills, the ability to solve problems without any resources, as well as demonstrate very good graphic calculator skills. The subject is demanding and challenging and is recommended for students who have performed at or above the expected standard in Year 10 Maths B. It is also a prerequisite for many university courses. Students who wish to study a second stream of mathematics in Year 11 must select General Maths as their second maths course.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Mathematical Methods (CAS) Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr P. Di Natale - Faculty Leader of Mathematics

    Mr D. Strantzen - VCE Mathematical Methods Teacher

    Ms S. Pavia - VCE Mathematical Methods Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Mathematical Methods:

     

  • VCE Media
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Media is the study of media forms (film, radio, magazines, the Internet), the creation of media processes and the media's relationship with society. The focus of VCE Media is the creation of media products including magazines, web pages, music videos, video, animation and photography. Units 1 & 2 concentrate on how various groups are portrayed in the media and making media products. Units 3 & 4 focus on the codes and conventions of film, ideology, the influence of the media on society and the creation of media products. It is an ideal subject for students who wish to understand the role of the media and to create their own films or magazines. Strong writing skills are required to undertake this subject as well as a willingness to create many media products in a variety of forms.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Media Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mrs P. Glover - Faculty Leader of Visual Arts

    Mr K. Tibaldi - VCE Media Teacher

    Ms M. Keele - VCE Media Teacher

    Mr B. Schubert - VCE Media Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Media:

     

  • VCE Music Performance
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Music Performance provides students with the opportunity to study music as a performer, a creator of music works or arrangements and as a person who studies music works from cultural and historical traditions. The focus of Music Performance is the development of an understanding of the value and importance of music. Units 1 & 2 concentrate on the development of skills in both solo and group performances. Units 3 & 4 focus further on developing and refining performance skills. It is an ideal subject for students who wish to channel their musical abilities. Sound listening and aural skills, sight-reading skills and writing skills are required to undertake this subject. In addition, students should have at least three years experience prior to Year 11 on a musical instrument or in voice. Throughout Units 1 to 4, students need to participate in additional instrumental music and/or vocal lessons.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Music Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr M. Spiteri - Faculty Leader of Performing Arts

    Ms L. Rizzi - VCE Music Performance Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Music Performance:

     

  • VCE Philosophy
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    VCE Philosophy contains a broad introduction to western philosophy and its methods of inquiry. It explores themes and debates within metaphysics, epistemology (philosophy of knowledge) and value theory, as well as techniques of reasoning and argument drawn from formal and informal logic. It investigates human nature through questions about the relationship between body and mind, and personal identity, leading to an examination of the good life. Prescribed texts by significant philosophers are used to develop a critical appreciation of key questions and contemporary debates. Where religious concepts and traditions of thought are discussed, they are considered from a philosophical rather than theological point of view.

    Unit 1: Existence, knowledge and reasoning

    What is the nature of reality? How can we acquire certain knowledge? These are some of the questions that have challenged humans for millennia and underpin ongoing endeavours in areas as diverse as science, justice and the arts. This unit engages students with fundamental philosophical questions through active, guided investigation and critical discussion of two key areas of philosophy: epistemology and metaphysics. The emphasis is on philosophical inquiry – ‘doing philosophy’, for example through formulation of questions and philosophical exchanges with others. Hence the study and practice of techniques of reasoning are central to this unit. As students learn to think philosophically, appropriate examples of philosophical viewpoints and arguments, both contemporary and historical, are used to support, stimulate and enhance their thinking about central concepts and problems. At least one of these examples will be from a primary philosophical text using a complete text or an extract. For the purposes of this study, a primary text is defined as offering a positive argument or viewpoint rather than a mere critique.

    Students investigate relevant debates in applied epistemology and metaphysics, and consider whether the philosophical bases of these debates continue to have relevance in contemporary society and our everyday lives. Outcome areas of study include Metaphysics, Epistemology and an Introduction to Philosophical Inquiry.

    Unit 2: Questions of value

    What are the foundations of our judgments about value? What is the relationship between different types of value? How, if at all, can particular value judgments be defended or criticised?

    This unit enables students to explore these questions in relation to different categories of value judgment within the realms of morality, political and social philosophy and aesthetics. Students also explore ways in which viewpoints and arguments in value theory can inform and be informed by contemporary debates. They study at least one primary philosophical text, using the complete text or an extract, and develop a range of skills including formulating philosophical questions and informed responses. For the purposes of this study a primary text is defined as offering a positive argument or viewpoint rather than mere critique.

    Students investigate and analyse the following areas of study: Ethics and moral philosophy; Further problems in value theory; and Techniques of philosophical inquiry.

    Unit 3: Minds, bodies and persons

    This unit considers basic questions regarding the mind and the self through two key questions: Are human beings more than their bodies? Is there a basis for the belief that an individual remains the same person over time? Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments put forward in philosophical sources to their own views on these questions and to contemporary debates.

    Area of Study 1: Minds and bodies

    The central concern of the philosophy of mind is to explain the relationship between the body and the mind. The difficulty in advancing such an explanation stems from the fact that bodies and minds appear to be very different types of entities. To illustrate, consider that the experience of reading doesn’t obviously feel like neurons firing in a brain. Some philosophers argue that such apparent differences indicate that the two are in reality fundamentally independent entities. Others typically argue that the mind is just the physical body but then must reconcile the apparent differences.

    Area of Study 2: Personal identity

    Modern philosophers have explored the question of the continuity of the self over time. They have attempted to identify the basis on which we say, for example, that an individual is the same person at 80 as they were at eight years old. Self, in this sense, is a contested term that refers to what is most essential about ourselves as a particular entity distinguished from others, if anything.

    In this area of study students explore selected positions on personal identity and the arguments for and against them. In doing so, students consider the implications of views on personal identity for personal responsibility of past actions and personal concern for future happiness. Students consider how thought experiments can be used to explore and challenge theories of personal identity. A range of relevant thought experiments is to be sourced from within the set texts where possible and beyond the set texts as appropriate. Students apply their understanding of philosophical concepts and problems related to personal identity to analyses of contemporary debates such as organ transplants and cloning.

    Unit 4: The good life

    This unit considers the crucial question of what it is for a human to live well. What does an understanding of human nature tell us about what it is to live well? What is the role of happiness in a life well lived? Is morality central to a good life? How does our social context impact on our conception of a good life? In this unit, students explore philosophical texts that have had a significant impact on western ideas about the good life. Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments in set texts to their views.

    Area of Study 1: Conceptions of the good life

    In this area of study students are exposed to philosophical concepts, debates and perspectives on the nature of the good life through a study of philosophical texts. As they reflect on the implications of accepting the views and arguments presented by these thinkers, students develop their own critical responses to the authors’ viewpoints.

    Area of Study 2: Living the good life in the twenty-first century

    An important aspect of the study of philosophical texts is the light that they can shed on contemporary questions and debates. In this area of study students develop and justify responses to debates on technological development in relation to the good life. They outline arguments made in a variety of sources and critically respond to them. They explore the interplay between the changing conditions of contemporary life and our ability to live a good life, considering how the strength of the interplay is dependent not only on the nature of developments in contemporary life but on the conception of the good life.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Philosophy Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Philosophy:

     

  • VCE Physical Education
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Physical Education is a study of the complex set of factors that determine our performance and participation in physical activity. It focuses on the complex interrelationship between motor-learning and psychological, biomechanical, physiological and sociological and cultural factors that influence physical performances. It is intended for students contemplating further studies in fields such as human movement, nursing or physiotherapy, as well as providing valuable knowledge and skills for participating in their own sporting and physical activity pursuits. Physical Education incorporates a substantial theoretical component. Practical activities are conducted to support theory work done in class and to collect data for laboratory reports, video analysis or to present an oral report. As well as being a keen sportsperson, students need to have an interest in how and why our body performs the way it does during physical activity.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Physical Education Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr B. Beecham - Faculty Leader of Health and Physical Education

    Miss M. Moylan - VCE Physical Education Teacher

    Mr C. Whitford - VCE Physical Education Teacher

    Mr P. White - VCE Physical Education Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Physical Education:

     

  • VCE Physics
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Physics is a study of the physical universe from the minute building blocks of matter to the unimaginably broad expanse of our solar system. The focus of physics is to analyse conceptually, mathematically and diagrammatically, physical occurrences in our own world and beyond. Units 1 & 2 concentrate on the physical properties of light, nuclear energy, medical physics, laws of motion, electricity and alternative energy sources. Although Units 3 & 4 extend upon the topics of motion, electricity and light, there is also an analysis of structures and materials and of the properties of sound. It is an ideal subject for students who want to challenge and expand their mathematical, logical, reading and practical skills. A strong ability in expressive writing and mathematical computations is required to undertake this subject, as well as a willingness to read challenging texts and respond to difficult contextual questions. It is strongly recommended that students combine Physics with Maths Methods as the minimum level of mathematics, and the addition of Specialist Mathematics at Year 11 is also highly advantageous.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Physics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr I. Hoffman - VCE Physics Teacher

    Ms K. Thomson - Faculty Leader of Science

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Physics:

     

  • VCE Politics
    Units 1&2: Australian and Global Politics

    General Description

    VCE Australian and Global Politics is the study of contemporary power at both national and global levels. Through this study students explore, explain, analyse and evaluate national and global political issues, and events.

    Australian Politics is the study of how power is gained and exercised. It considers the significant ideas about organising political systems and features of the way politics is practised in Australia. It evaluates Australian democratic practices against particular ideas and principles that include representation, respect for rights, recognition of diversity and freedom of speech. Australian Politics compares Australian democracy with the system of democracy of the United States of America. The study also examines the ways that the national government uses its power to make and implement public policy, and the national stakeholders and international challenges that influence that policy.

    Global Politics is the study of the political, social, cultural and economic forces that shape interactions between states and other global actors in the contemporary world. It examines the interconnectedness of the contemporary global political arena and the impact of globalisation on culture, sovereignty, human rights and the environment. It examines the nature and power of key global actors and the types of power used by an Asia-Pacific state to achieve its national interests. It considers global ethical issues including human rights, people movement, development and arms control and explores the nature and effectiveness of global responses to crises such as climate change, armed conflict, terrorism and economic instability.

    Unit 1: Ideas, actors and power

    In this unit students are introduced to the key ideas relating to the exercise of political power. They explore how these ideas shape political systems and in particular the characteristics of liberalism. They consider the nature of power in Australian democracy and in a non-democratic political system. They also explore the nature and influence of key political actors in Australia: political parties, interest groups and the media. All these forms of participation in Australian democracy influence the political agenda.

    Unit 2: Global connections

    This unit introduces students to the global community and the global actors that are part of this community. Students explore the myriad of ways that lives have been affected by the increased interconnectedness – the global links – of the world through the process of globalisation. Students analyse and evaluate the extent to which global actors cooperate and share visions and goals as part of the global community. They investigate the ability of the global community to manage areas of global cooperation and to respond to issues of global conflict and instability.

    This subject is a Units 1 & 2 level study, which links to Politics: Australian Units 3 & 4 to create a full sequence of VCE Politics units.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Australian & Global Politics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Politics 1 & 2:

     

  • VCE Politics: Australian
    Units 3&4

    General Description

    Unit 3: Evaluating Australian democracy

    This unit introduces students to the core principles and operation of the Australian political system.

    Area of Study 1 Australian democracy focuses on the values and principles that underpin the Australian political system. It introduces the key elements of liberal democracy and representative government and explores how they operate in theory and practice. Students investigate key questions such as: What is a liberal democracy and what are its core values and principles? To what extent do the institutions and processes of the Australian political system uphold these values and principles? What are the democratic strengths and weaknesses of the Australian political system?

    Australia is considered to be a liberal democracy in that individuals enjoy rights and freedoms and governments are elected in free and fair elections. Governments are held accountable for their decisions and actions to the people through the parliament and ultimately to the people through the electoral system. The values and principles of the Australian system of government include: protection of democratic rights and freedoms; participation of citizens in the political process; popular sovereignty; majority rule and respect for minorities; representation; accountability and the rule of law.

    Area of Study 2 Comparing democracies: Australia and the United States of America evaluates the Australian liberal democratic system further by comparing it with the political system of the United States of America (USA). Students examine the key features of the US political system including the separation of powers and checks and balances. They consider whether the US Constitution with its Bill of Rights better protects democratic rights and freedoms than the Australian system. Students consider aspects of the electoral system and the operation of the Congress including non-compulsory voting, primary elections, the electoral college and the impact of political parties on Congress. They consider the similarities and differences from the Australian system, especially in terms of democratic values and principles including fairness and representativeness of each system.

    VCE Australian Politics is a contemporary study and focus must be on examples and case studies from within the last 10 years.

    Unit 4: Australian public policy

    This unit focuses on Australian federal public policy formulation and implementation. During the formulation stage of many public policies, the government is subject to pressures from competing stakeholders and interests. As the government responds to these influences and pressures, policy proposals are often subject to change and compromise. Students investigate the complexities the government faces in putting public policy into operation.

    Area of Study 1 Domestic Policy examines domestic policy, that which is largely concerned with Australian society and affecting people living in Australia. Students investigate ONE contemporary Australian domestic policy issue and consider the policy response of the Australian government to that issue. They analyse the major influences on the formulation of the policy and the factors affecting the success of its implementation.

    In Area of Study 2, Foreign Policy students consider contemporary Australian foreign policy. As it deals with Australia’s broad national interests, foreign policy may be less subject to the pressures and interests of competing stakeholders. Students examine the major objectives and instruments of contemporary Australian foreign policy and the key challenges facing contemporary Australian foreign policy.

    VCE Australian Politics is a contemporary study and focus must be on examples and case studies from within the last 10 years.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Australian & Global Politics Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Marcuccio - Faculty Leader of Humanities

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Politics: Australian 3 & 4:

     

  • VCE Product Design & Technology: Materials
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    In Product Design & Technology, students assume the role of a designer-maker and develop knowledge and skills to produce effective and creative responses to design challenges. Designing transforms ideas into plans for the creation and manufacture of useful products. Units 1 & 2 focus on analysis, modification and improvement of an exisiting product design, providing the opportunity to work with others on a product range or theme. In Units 3 & 4, students design and develop a product that meets the needs and expectations of a client or an end-user that is influenced by a range of complex factors, including client or community requirements, innovation, social and economic trends, availability of resources and technological developments in industry. Students examine a range of factors that influence the design and development of products within industrial/commercial settings. It is an ideal subject for students who want to further their studies in the building, drafting, industrial design, craft, education or forestry fields.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Product Design & Technology Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr M. Gowers – Faculty Leader of Technology

    Alternative VCE Product Design & Technology Program

    St Monica's College also offers this VCE study in another format (N.B: You can only select ONE of these formats):

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Product Design & Technology: Materials:

     

  • VCE Product Design & Technology: Textiles
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Students acquire and apply knowledge of a range of design factors and fundamentals to produce textile products in response to a design brief or need. They develop knowledge and practise particular skills in which they investigate, design, produce and evaluate clothing and other textile products. Units 1 & 2 focus on design modification and improvement of an existing product, providing an opportunity to work with others as a team on a product range or theme. Units 3 & 4 students design and develop a product such as a garment and matching accessory that meets the needs and expectations of a client or end–user. Students examine a range of factors that influence the design and development of products within industrial/commercial settings. It is an ideal subject for students who want to pursue further study in the fields of product or fashion design. A willingness and passion to explore and research a variety of design options or ideas while developing folio presentation skills is required. It is recommended that students have basic skills in garment construction methods and basic knowledge in the use of commercial patterns.

    Images

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Product Design & Technology Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms E. Italiano - VCE Product Design & Technology: Textiles Teacher

    Alternative VCE Product Design & Technology Program

    St Monica's College also offers this VCE study in another format (N.B: You can only select ONE of these formats):

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Product Design & Technology: Textiles:

     

  • VCE Psychology
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    A study of the nature and development of the mind and behaviour in humans and animals from the biological, cognitive and social aspects, in particular the biological structures and processes that underpin and sustain us. Methods of research and the ethical principles guiding that research are introduced. Units 1 & 2 focus on psychology as a scientific study, major perspectives that govern a psychologists approach to researching human behaviour, visual perception, lifespan (developmental) psychology, interpersonal and group behaviour, intelligence, personality and research methods. Units 3 & 4 focus on the conscious self and the relationship between mind, brain and body. As part of these units, consciousness, sleep, the nervous system and brain research methods are investigated. Concepts such as memory, learning, mental health and research methods are also covered. This subject caters for students who are interested in why humans behave in a particular way, who have good reading skills and average to above average mathematics skills.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Psychology Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms K. Thomson - Faculty Leader of Science

    Ms N. Morcom - VCE Psychology Teacher

    Ms N. Gillespie - VCE Psychology Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Psychology:

     

  • VCE Studio Arts
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Amasha Samaratumge

    VCE Studio Arts introduces students to the role and practices of artists in society. They develop an understanding of the way artists work in a range of cultures and periods of time and they explore artists’ perceptions, beliefs, actions and their relationship with the viewer.

    Student research focuses on critical, reflective and creative thinking They examine how artists develop style and use materials, techniques and processes to create aesthetic qualities in artworks.

    Elisha Ciano

    They also consider the ways in which artists work to develop and resolve artworks, including their use of inspiration and their creative processes.

    In Unit 1 &2, students focus on developing an individual understanding of the stages of studio practice and learn how to explore, develop, refine, resolve and present artworks. Through the study of art movements and styles, students begin to understand the use of other artists’ work in the making of new artworks. Students also develop skills in the visual analysis of artworks. The exhibition of artworks is integral to Unit 2 and students are encouraged to visit a variety of exhibition spaces throughout the unit, reflect on the different environments and examine how artworks are presented to an audience.

    Katrina Engle

    In Unit 3&4, students focus on the implementation of an individual studio process leading to the production of a range of trials & potential directions. Students develop and use an exploration proposal to define an area of creative exploration. They plan and apply a studio process to explore and develop their individual ideas. Analysis of these explorations and the development of the potential directions is an intrinsic part of the studio process to support the making of finished artworks in Unit 4.

    Unit 4 also investigates aspects of artists’ involvement in the art industry, focusing on a least two different exhibitions. Students investigate the methods and considerations of the artist and/or curator involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks displayed in exhibitions.

    Studio Arts equips students with the knowledge and skills to pursue an art studio practice and follow tertiary and industry pathways in fine art, research and education.

    This area of study is also aimed at students who require a folio for entrance to further studies.


    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Studio Arts Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Ms P. Glover- Faculty Leader of Visual Arts

    Mr S. Ong - VCE Studio Arts Teacher

    Mr S. Kalantzis - VCE Studio Arts Teacher

    Mr G. Mahoney - VCE Studio Arts Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Studio Arts:

     

  • VCE Systems Engineering
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    This study investigates the design, operation, construction, assembly, maintenance, repair and evaluation of technological systems applicable to a diverse range of fields such as engineering, manufacturing, automation, electrotechnology, robotics, and energy management. The study includes both theoretical and practical components and design folio development. The study promotes innovative thinking and problem solving skills through a project based learning approach. Units 1 & 2 focus on mechanical and electrotechnology engineering fundamentals, while Units 3 & 4 focus on energy and integrated, controlled system engineering. The study can provide for students seeking entry into tertiary technology courses, e.g. engineering and applied sciences, or skilled trades and vocational training in the electrotechnology and automotive sectors. A sound knowledge of general mathematical principles is needed in order for students to be able to understand the engineering fundamentals involved in the study. Students need to be willing to spend the necessary time required to grasp the theoretical component of the study.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Systems Engineering Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mr M. Gowers – Faculty Leader of Technology

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Studio Arts:

     

  • VCE Theatre Studies
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Theatre Studies focuses on the interpretation of playscripts and the production of plays from the premodern era to the present day. Students apply stagecraft including acting, to study the nature, diversity and characteristics of theatre as an art form. Throughout the study students work with playscripts in both their written form and in performance. They learn about the times, places and cultures of key theatrical developments and develop awareness of the traditions and histories of theatre. This knowledge is applied through use of stagecraft to collaboratively interpret playscripts in performance. Through contribution to the production of plays and performance of a monologue, students also develop knowledge and understanding of theatrical styles, which is further developed by analysis and evaluation of their own productions and productions by professional theatre practitioners. Theatre Studies provides students with pathways to further studies in fields such as theatre production and theatre design, script writing and studies in theatre history.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Theatre Studies Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Documents

    Relevant Staff

    Mr M. Spiteri - Faculty Leader of Performing Arts

    Mr R. Whitehouse - VCE Theatre Studies Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Theatre Studies:

     

  • VCE Visual Communication & Design
    Units 1-4

    General Description

    Bradly Moran

    Visual Communication Design is intended to develop students' visual and spatial abilities and examines the way visual language can be used to convey ideas, information and messages in the fields of communication, environmental and industrial design. Visual Communication Design relies on drawing as the primary component of visual language to support the conception and visualisation of ideas. Consequently, the subject emphasises the importance of developing a variety of drawing skills to visualise thinking and to present potential solutions.

    Bradly Moran

    Units 1 & 2 provide a solid grounding in technical drawing, rendering, computer skills and the use of the design process to generate and develop visual communications. Students undertake cartooning, illustration and symbolism throughout the year. Students learn how to communicate ideas through the manipulation and organisation of design elements, design principles, selected media and methods of production.

    Bradly Moran

    In Units 3 & 4 students investigate and analyse the work and practices of contemporary designers. Through this research they acquire knowledge and inspiration to support the development of their own visual communications. Students undertake a series of practical tasks designed to replicate the work processes of professional designers. They are taught skills in creative, critical and reflective thinking designed to support their progress through the development of their own design folio. Design thinking supports skill development in areas beyond design, including science, business, marketing and management.

    The subject is aimed at students who require a folio of design work for entrance to further studies, or seek to improve the quality of their electronic communications. Students must be prepared to take full responsibility for the presentation of their design work and strive to maintain a high level of attention to detail.

    The study of Visual Communication Design can provide pathways to training and tertiary study in design and design-related studies including, advertising, fashion design, engineering, architecture and media.

    VCAA Information

    VCAA VCE Visual Communication & Design Index - the official VCAA webpage for this course

    Relevant Staff

    Mrs P. Glover - Faculty Leader of Visual Arts

    Mr W. Smith - VCE Visual Communication Design Teacher

    Suggested Combinations

    The following subjects are suggested combinations with VCE Visual Communication & Design:

     

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